News

What Exactly Does It Take?

When folks visit my website, they may or may not read the “Giclée Prints” section, and may or may not know what it takes to make a fine art giclée print. So, to illustrate how exceptional the resolution and printing is in the finished product, I’ve taken a snippet from my last painting, Crystal Head.

Crystal Head with InsetThe first image has a small, white, square on the forehead area of the skull, showing the location of the “snippet.” The second, enlarged image shows the area contained by the white square. You can easily see the texture of the canvas and my brush strokes in the enlarged image. Notice that there is absolutely no pixelization in the enlarged image. The snippet represents approximately one square inch of the actual painting, which is 432 square inches in area. If one wished to do so, the print could be enlarged to many times its normal size with no degradation of the image. Naturally, smaller prints–available by special order–can be made with no loss in quality.

Hopefully, this sheds some light on what goes into making my fine art prints, and why I am so excited about being able to offer them.

Crystal Head Snippet

Let Me Be Crystal Clear

Crystal Head
Title: Crystal Head
Print: Giclée on Canvas
Size: 18″ x 24″
Buy Print ($240)
Buy Original – contact artist

My latest effort is titled “Crystal Head,” which is a bit unoriginal, since it’s the brand of the vodka, but it’s the only thing that seemed to fit. I thought about “Three Huge Olives,” but the real star of the painting is certainly the bottle, so I chose to let the title stand.

Ever since the first moment I saw this bottle, I knew I had to paint it. All the other bottles I’ve painted have been fairly easy by comparison, with a reflection here and there, but this one; it is one huge puzzle of reflections! “Crystal Head” was a bear to paint. I used no less than six reference photos–as well as the actual bottle–to paint it. Finally, I had to say, “Finished.”

So many people ask, “How long did it take you to paint that?” It’s often a difficult question to answer, as I don’t log my hours when I paint, and much of my time is spent studying the subject, and studying what I’ve done up to that point. When I add it all up, it can run into weeks. I’d say the actual painting time of “Crystal Head” was approximately 70-75 hours. Of course, I don’t sit (actually stand) in front of the canvas for eight hours a day, so those hours stretch over a couple of months. I started “Crystal Head” in late December, 2017.

I appreciate the support and encouragement I get with every painting, and take all of your comments to heart. My daughter, Kasey, is helping me get up to speed with Instagram, so please follow me there if you’re not already, and I will follow you back.

Thank you so much!

Another Shiny Thing

CH Cork Sneak PeekI’m working on something shiny again, but this time, it’s not a tequila bottle and associated accessories. It’s a vodka bottle, martini glass, and three big olives: the ultimate shiny thing, and quite the challenge. I probably will have painted this bottle six times by the time I’m finished, but it is fun trying to capture this one. I believe you’ll see why when you see the final work; it’s a very complex surface.

My objective with this painting is to have something to offer at the next art show I’m participating in at the Queen Creek Olive Mill, hence the olives. The show date is Sunday, February 11th, so if you find yourself bored and driving aimlessly around on that day, please drop in and say “hi.” I’ll have my “usual suspects” on display, along with the new shiny departure. It is an acrylic on canvas, 18” x 24”, and I may not have prints on hand as I will be rushing to complete this one by the date of the show. As always, prints are no more than a couple of weeks out, so if you or anyone you know would like to buy a print–or the original–please contact me. Thanks for your support and encouragement!

Hello Again…Hello

Jerry at WorkIt’s been a while since I posted a new painting,  so I thought I’d let everyone know I’m still at it. I’ve completed another painting that, in a couple of ways, is a departure for me. First of all, it’s not a tequila painting, and secondly, it’s a 22” x 28” oil on canvas. I will post it soon, and I’ll let you know more about it when it’s here. That being said, I am getting close to finishing another tequila painting, a 28” x 22” acrylic on canvas, and will also announce that one here soon as well.

I’m doing something I’ve not done before, which is showing a snippet of the painting in progress. I keep threatening to do a video of me working on a painting, and as soon as I figure out how to do that I’ll post it. I may need to recruit some help there to get it in a format that I can upload to Youtube. Meanwhile, here is a “teaser” of my latest work-in-progress, or “WIP” for you inventory folks. Once again, these are a few of my favorite things. Thanks for tuning in!

A Different Kind of Shiny

Russ' Pour
Title: Russ’s Pour
Print: Giclée on Canvas
Size: 16″ x 24″
Buy Print ($200)
Buy Original – N/A

There is a change in my Acrylic Gallery; I’ve been asked about this one before. A good friend commissioned a painting of a Vodka bottle for a gift. Not tequila, but a shiny bottle and glasses. I’ve finally gotten it photographed and proofed, and prints are available for the first time. It is a bottle of Chopin (pronounced Sho-PAN) and highlights a frosted bottle that was a real challenge to paint. I’m pretty pleased with how it turned out, and even put in a couple of spills for an added something. The original is titled “Russ’s Pour” and is a 16” x 24” acrylic on canvas. The original is not available; however, giclėe prints are available in the original size or smaller by special order.

If you have a favorite whiskey, Scotch, Gin, wine bottle, or whatever you’d like, I’d be happy to paint it for you. See How to Buy for more details, or drop me a line via the Contact Page.

All this talk about Vodka is making me thirsty for a martini…